Peace Corps Volunteers Work Around the World to Curb Hunger World Food Day on October 16 Perfect Time to Highlight Peace Corps Efforts

October 16, 1996

WASHINGTON - October 16, 1996 — The facts are clear. More than 800 million people—one in seven on the planet—suffer chronic hunger and malnutrition. Almost 200 million of these are young children. On October 16, World Food Day will be observed to raise awareness of these problems and help build a more food-secure world. 

Peace Corps volunteers work each day with communities, families and children to reduce malnutrition and hunger. They work with farmers to find better ways to grow crops, and raise fish and livestock. Peace Corps volunteers also work as nutritionists, showing local people how to eat food rich in nutrients, or as teachers, showing students how to grow a garden. 

"Peace Corps volunteers play an important role in the day-to-day fight against hunger and malnutrition in the world," said Peace Corps Director Mark Gearan. "Peace Corps and World Food Day are working to reach the same goal—ensuring that all people have the food they need to live healthy and productive lives."

Peace Corps Volunteers—Working for a Food-Secure World

Volunteers are teaching food self-reliance and nutrition at 160 schools in Lesotho. Because of their efforts, thousands of students have safe drinking water, a better understanding of nutrition, and receive a nourishing school meal each day. 

During the past 20 years, the sheep production in Ecuador has decreased by 50 percent causing a deficit in wool and meat production. Volunteers provide training in sheep production, and help in marketing and pasture management. 

In Guatemala, volunteers increased the production in eggs among the chickens by working with farmers to change the chicken feed from corn and left-over tortillas to a mix of sunflower seeds and homegrown Pidgeon Pea. 

In Morocco, one volunteer, noticing a prevalence of simple illnesses in livestock, designed a book on the detection and treatment of common maladies affecting livestock and translated it into Arabic for herders.

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