Office of Inspector General

Follow us on Twitter:
Peace Corps Inspector General Kathy Buller discusses OIG's mission and operations.

The purpose of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) is to prevent fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement and to promote effectiveness and efficiency in government. 

OIG is an independent entity within the Peace Corps. The Inspector General reports directly to Congress and the Peace Corps Director, keeping them fully and currently informed concerning the programs and operations of the Peace Corps. 

The inspector general for the Peace Corps is Kathy A. Buller.

Get new reports from the Office of Inspector General sent to your inbox.

Sign up

Recent Inspector General reports

All reports

The objective of this limited scope follow-up review was to determine if the agreed upon corrective actions taken in response to four findings from the Final Report on the Program Evaluation of Peace Corps/Namibia issued in March 2013 were fully implemented and had the intended effects. We found that, overall, the post had improved with respect to three of the four areas selected for review, particularly in iterating on feedback and agency guidance where technical training was concerned. This follow-up included four recommendations, all with which the post concurred.

  • 2019
  • Evaluation
  • Post Operations
Download

The objective of this limited scope follow up review was to determine if the agreed upon corrective actions taken in response to three findings from the Final Report on the Program Evaluation of Peace Corps/Nepal (IG-15-05-E) were fully implemented and had the intended effects. We found that, overall, Peace Corps/Nepal had improved regarding all three findings selected for review. We found 2 areas of concern related to the post's site selection criteria and whereabouts tracking. This report included 2 recommendations for management's consideration.

  • 2019
  • Evaluation
  • Post Operations
Download

This evaluation had two objectives: (1) to describe the range of homestay models that Peace Corps posts were implementing and better understand their advantages and challenges; and (2) to assess the impact of homestay requirements on Volunteer safety, language acquisition, integration, and health. We found that the majority (63 percent) of Peace Corps posts implemented homestay requirements during service, though the number of months required varied. Evidence from this analysis does not support the assumption that better Volunteer outcomes will be achieved in all contexts. Given the costs of administering and potential risk associated with homestay programs, posts that transition to or increase homestay requirements should rigorously monitor safety and language outcomes.

  • 2019
  • Evaluation
  • Impact
Download


Contact us

While providing your contact information is optional, it is strongly encouraged so that an OIG representative can contact you if questions arise or additional information is needed.

Call
Address

Peace Corps
Office of Inspector General
P.O. Box 57129
Washington, DC 20037-7129