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Become a Master’s International Student

Becoming a Master’s International student requires a combination of focus, flexibility, and dedication. You’ll begin by completing one to two academic years on campus. Next, you will receive your Volunteer assignment and travel to your host country to begin your two-year service. Volunteer service starts with three months of language, cross-cultural, and technical training. At the end of that training, you will receive your site and project assignments, which are developed by in-country staff based upon the needs and requests of the country. Before leaving for your site, you will be sworn in as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

While abroad, you will be a Peace Corps Volunteer first and foremost; however, you will have time to develop an international academic project. Following service, you may be required to return to campus to complete your academic project, or any other outstanding work needed for your degree. After finishing your academic work, you will receive a master's degree in your respective field—and you’ll already have two years of significant international work experience.

Benefits of Master's International for Students
You'll have a master's degree and two years of international experience to show for your efforts.
How to Apply
Details about the application process.

Last updated Mar 14 2014

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Learn more about our Coverdell Fellows and Master's International programs.

Contact Master's International

For more information contact:

Paul D. Coverdell Peace Corps Headquarters
VRS/R/MI
1111 20th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20526

Phone: 855.855.1961, ext. 1812
Fax: 202.692.1727

Email: mastersinternational@
peacecorps.gov

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