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Peace Corps Director Williams Welcomes 21 Fellows from the National Hispana Leadership Institute

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2012 – Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams welcomed 21 Fellows from the National Hispana Leadership Institute (NHLI) to Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., on June 21. The Fellows, aged 18 to 24, had lunch with Director Williams and learned about the benefits of Peace Corps service.

“Both Peace Corps and NHLI have a lot in common, as we both seek to find our leaders of tomorrow and provide training and professional development opportunities,” said Director Williams. “It is my hope that in the future we’ll be able to identify National Hispana Leadership Fellows who are interested in making a difference at home and abroad through Peace Corps service.”
 

Director Williams highlighted the important role Hispanic Americans have played in representing the United States through the Peace Corps. Currently, more than 600 Hispanic Americans are serving as Peace Corps volunteers in countries around the world.

“Serving with the Peace Corps is not only an opportunity to cultivate leadership skills, but also a chance to become an active member of our global community by developing friendships and helping others,” continued Director Williams. “It is very apparent that many of you have the skills and determination necessary to help promote peace at home and overseas, which is what we look for in our Peace Corps volunteers.”

About The National Hispana Leadership Institute: The National Hispana Leadership Institute (NHLI), a 501(c)3 organization based in Washington, DC, was established in 1987 to address the underrepresentation of Latinas in the corporate, nonprofit, and political arenas. NHLI’s mission is to develop Hispanas as ethical leaders through training, professional development, relationship building, and community activism.

About the Peace Corps: Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order on March 1, 1961, more than 200,000 Americans have served in 139 host countries. Today, 9,095 volunteers are working with local communities in 75 host countries. Peace Corps volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a 27-month commitment and the agency’s mission is to promote world peace and friendship and a better understanding between Americans and people of other countries. Visit www.peacecorps.gov for more information.

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