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Peace Corps Recognizes Top Volunteer-Producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Howard University Holds Top Spot in 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C. March 6, 2012 Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams is proud to recognize the top Peace Corps volunteer-producing Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This year, Howard University in Washington, DC, holds the top rank for HBCUs with 17 undergraduate alumni serving as Peace Corps volunteers.

We are thrilled to congratulate these academic institutions for continuing to cultivate a commitment to public service, said Peace Corps Director Williams (Returned Peace Corps volunteer, Dominican Republic, 1967- 1970). As a Peace Corps volunteer in the Dominican Republic, I learned that when we work together for a common goal we can achieve magnificent things. Peace Corps service firmly placed me on the path to pursue a career in international development. In countless ways, my Peace Corps service shaped my career and who I am today.

The following are the top three Peace Corps volunteer producing HBCUs. The numbers in parentheses represent the number of alumni currently serving as Peace Corps volunteers:

  1. Howard University (17)

  2. Morehouse College (9)

  3. Spelman College (6)
     

The Peace Corps works to ensure that its volunteers reflect the extraordinary diversity of America, which has enriched and strengthened our country in countless ways. People with diverse backgrounds often have unique cross-cultural experiences which enhances their potential to be effective volunteers. Peace Corps recognizes the value of a diverse volunteer corps that represents the United States and is committed to diversity recruitment.

Magnifying glass iconHoward University graduate and Peace Corps/Guatemala volunteer Keisha Herbert with girls she taught to create vegetable gardens in recycled car and truck tires.Howard University graduate Keisha Herbert has been a Peace Corps volunteer in Guatemala since April 2010. Herbert of Cleveland, Ohio, has been working with youth and has taught girls to make tire gardens and grow vegetables. To read more about Herberts work, click here.

Peace Corps service provides both tangible benefits and a life-defining leadership experience. Peace Corps volunteers return from service as global citizens and receive support from the Peace Corps in the form of career services, graduate school opportunities, advantages in federal employment, readjustment allowances, and loan deferment and cancellation opportunities.

Peace Corps nine regional recruiting offices across the United States work to recruit and provide information and guidance to prospective Peace Corps volunteers. Potential applicants can connect with a local recruiter and locate their local regional recruiting office by visiting the Peace Corps website here.

About the Peace Corps: Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order on March 1, 1961, more than 200,000 Americans have served in 139 host countries. Today, 9,095 volunteers are working with local communities in 75 host countries. Peace Corps volunteers must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age. Peace Corps service is a 27-month commitment and the agencys mission is to promote world peace and friendship and a better understanding between Americans and people of other countries. Visit www.peacecorps.gov for more information.

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